Safeguarding

The English Institute of Sport is justifiably proud of its reputation and its ability to add value within the world of high performance sport. It takes its responsibilities and role very seriously and is committed to putting systems and procedures in place to safeguarding children and young people working with it.

Although the majority of children and young people have a fulfilling experience in sport, some children and young people may experience symptoms of abuse and/or poor practice linked to their participation. While experience of harm occurs at every level of sport, research shows that vulnerability to abuse and poor practice increases as young athletes make progress through the competitive ranks.

It is vital that anyone involved in sports provision for children and young people is alert to:

  • Possible indicators of abuse and neglect;
  • Risks that individual abusers or potential abusers, may pose to children; and
  • Understanding what actions they should take should concerns arise.

This is particularly important in light of the unique relationship that EIS has in supporting athletes at the elite level through the provision of sports science and sports medicine.

Children and young people who experience symptoms of abuse are likely to choose someone they trust to raise concerns. It is therefore important that everyone who has involvement with children and young people knows how to respond appropriately. EIS recognises the important role that it, in partnership with staff from the National Governing Bodies, play in providing this support.

EIS is committed to creating and maintaining a safe and positive environment for all young people who are involved with sport. It treats safeguarding very seriously and is committed to tackling any areas of concern which are raised.

The EIS are also working towards the Safeguarding in Sport Standards. We have achieved the Preliminary level and are well on our way to achieving the Intermediate level.

For elite athletes under the age of 18 who work with EIS, there are a number of safeguards in place to protect their welfare and wellbeing.

Athlete induction

Each athlete has an induction to EIS which explains our stance on safeguarding.

Safer recruitment

Each practitioner being recruited to work with a sport which has young athletes under the age of 18 must have a Disclosure and Barring Service with barred list check and complete a self-disclosure providing details of any convictions. This must prove satisfactory to the EIS or the offer of employment can be removed. This is then re-checked every 3 years or sooner if the sport requires it.

All new starters with the EIS are required to give two references, one of which must be a previous employer and these must prove satisfactory to the EIS or the offer of employment can be removed.

Safeguarding Code of Conduct

The EIS has a Safeguarding Code of Conduct which all employees and contractors who work with EIS have to sign up to as a condition of employment. This sets out the behaviour expected of employees and practitioners in relation to working with children or being in a position of trust in relation to a young person within their role with EIS. Any breaches of this code of conduct will be dealt with under the disciplinary procedure.

Behaviour expected from young people working with EIS

In addition to the code of conduct for EIS staff, there is a standard of behaviour expected from young athletes themselves.  All young athletes are made aware of this at their athlete induction and are expected to abide by the guidelines. Any breaches will be reported back to the National Governing body.

Equality Training

All EIS members of staff have undertaken training on safeguarding.

Safeguarding Officers

The EIS has a lead Safeguarding Officer and a Deputy who have delegated responsibility for Safeguarding within the EIS. They will provide advice and guidance to the senior management team on all safeguarding and child protection issues and deal with any concerns raised in this area. Both are trained and have a clear job description.

Reporting concerns

The EIS has a process for reporting any child welfare concerns whether these are within or outside of the EIS sporting environment. The EIS has a case management group which includes both Safeguarding officers, and this group is responsible for managing any concerns raised.

The EIS Safeguarding Officers have direct contact with their counterparts in the sports that EIS works with and any concerns regarding the staff or coaches of a National Governing body can be passed on.

Dealing with questions/concerns/complaints/issues:

Please contact one of the named contacts below if:

  • you have any concerns about the safety of your child or a vulnerable adult working with the EIS;
  • you would like to obtain copies of any of the documents mentioned;
  • you have any concerns regarding the environment, staff, contractors or practices of the EIS;
  • you have any safeguarding or child protection queries in relation to the EIS.

Any formal complaints or child protection concerns/issues will be taken very seriously, acknowledged by EIS within 48 hours and action taken to investigate or address these.

You will receive an update or outcome to your complaint/concern within seven working days of reporting it to EIS.

If you are unhappy with the response given by EIS or the timescale commitments are not met you should raise your complaint/concern with the National Director who will investigate further and provide a response within seven working days. Details of how to contact the National Director will be provided in the initial acknowledgement by EIS of your complaint/concern. If the concern is serious and a child is in direct danger then you should contact the Police or your local Authority’s child services team.

Peter Elliott
Director of Operations and Lead Officer for Child ProtectionEnglish Institute of Sport
Tel: 01923 636452
Email: peter.elliott@eis2win.co.uk 
Tara Smith
Sport Services Manager and Deputy Lead Officer for Child ProtectionEnglish Institute of Sport
Tel: 07985 629973
Email: taram.smith@eis2win.co.uk

Who can support you?

NSPCC
Worried about a child? Advice and support whenever you need it.
Call 0808 800 5000

ChildLine
A free and confidential helpline for children who have concerns.
Call 0800 1111

The Safe Network
Safeguarding information and advice for the voluntary and community sector – from after school art clubs to weekend reading groups.
Call 0845 608 5404 Or email enquiries@safenetwork.org.uk

Child protection, safeguarding and government

Anti-bullying Alliance
Tel: 0207 843 1901 Email: aba@ncb.org.uk

Beat Bullying
Tel: 0208 771 3377 Email: info@betabullying.org

Bullying UK
Tel: 0808 800 2222 Email: help@bullying.co.uk

Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP)
Tel: 0870 000 3344

Disclosure and Barring Service (formally Criminal Records Bureau)
Tel: 0870 909 0811

Family Lives
Tel: 0808 800 2222

Internet Watch Foundation
Tel: 0122 323 7700 Email: information@iwf.org.uk

Kidscape
Tel: 0845 120 5204 Email: webinfo@kidscape.org.uk

National Children’s Bureau (NCB)
Tel: 0207 843 6000 Email: enquiries@ncb.org.uk

Women’s Aid
Tel: 0808 200 0247 Email: helpline@womensaid.org.uk

Samaritans UK
Tel: 08457 90 90 90

MIND
Tel: 0300 123 3393 Email: info@mind.org.uk

Sports organisations

Association for Physical Education (AfPE)
Tel: 0190 585 5584 Email: enquiries@afpe.org.uk

Institute for the Management of Sport and Physical Activity (IMSPA)
Tel: 0150 922 6474 Email: info@imspa.co.uk

Sport England
Tel: 0845 850 8508 Email: info@sportengland.org

Sport and Recreation Alliance
Tel: 0207 976 3900 Email: info@sportandrecreation.org.uk

sports coach UK
Tel: 0113 274 4802 Email: coaching@sportscoachuk.org

Youth Sport Trust (YST)
Tel: 0150 922 6600 Email: info@youthsporttrust.org